@piary

Crownboard1
The First Exhibit At @piary

The Bermondsey Street Bees share their patch of SE1 with some pretty elevated company. Their greying cedar hives survey the street from a perch four floors high, a great vantage point, so they don’t miss a trick about the comings and goings on the Street.

In recent years, the proliferation of art venues had caught their attention. Not to be outdone, the bees of Shard Hive have offered their crownboard for your delight and delectation. (Curator’s note : Media : wax on perspex. Runic maze or a devotional QR barcode ?)

At the White Cube Gallery on Bermondsey Street, Gilbert and George have just taken a bow with their in-your-face, factional “Scapegoating” show (You’ve got to admire their brio: “We don’t want to offend. We just want to get away with it”. Brilliant !). And at the Eames Fine Art Gallery, we’ve enjoyed a great sequence of shows, most memorable of which was local hero Norman Ackroyd’s Sea Changes summer display, not to omit Marc Chagall’s The Bible Lithographs, which opens next week.

Stepping up now at White Cube is Tracey Emin, whose exhibition is entitled “The Last Great Adventure is you”, which is etched in orange neon at the entrance. (Why Tracey, George and Gilbert, all of whom live at addresses in Fournier Street E1, think it best to ford the river to exhibit their works in Bermondsey Street SE1 , I can not say). As usual from her Eminence, great draughting, picasso-esque lines, but the greeting-card philosophy is too trite.

The Last Great Adventure Is You
The Last Great Adventure Is You

So how about a new, al fresco, roof-top, female collective atelier on Bermondsey Street ? Cool ! We’ll call it @piary.

4 Replies to “@piary”

        1. I have to confess that I took some time off work in today’s glorious sunshine to briefly visit the bees and pop the heat/moisture sensors on top of the middle brood frames.

          Checking for a warm brood nest and a moderate humidity reading on each hive will reassure me that the Bermondsey Street Bees are bearing up through the winter, without disturbing them.

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